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Old February 11th, 2017, 10:50 AM   #661
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in eastern Pennsylvania.

The SCAS is a Orwigsburg/Frackville, Pennsylvania-based nonprofit that has helped make life a little easier for those dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the county for the past decade. The nonprofit's goal is to provide information, support and resources to individuals with autism and autism spectrum disorders, their families, professionals and community awareness activities, education and research...
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Several parents gathered Sunday to "compare scores," but everyone was a winner at the sixth annual Sensory Picnic hosted by the [SCAS].

"When parents of autistic kids get together, there's often a lot of sharing stories like someone learned how to ask for something or quoted something correctly or wash up on their own," Sasha Eidinov, Pottsville, said. "These are like our baseball scores. It may not seem like much, but it's the little accomplishments."

Eidinov was one of about 70 people - parents and children - who attended the picnic...

Judy Barket, society president and picnic organizer, said the event was held to allow children to meet some of their peers, socialize and experience new things.

"There were several interactive stations that allowed the children to get to do things that they might not otherwise do on their own," Barket said.

Jessica Mennig, Pottsville, a society board member, was responsible for a tie-dying station that she called an educational opportunity mixed with fun.

"It's stimulating and allows for color recognition and honing of fine motor skills," Mennig said.

Barket said the picnic, like other events and meetings the society holds, helps to foster a community.

"This allows parents to network and talk about common daily hurdles that we have," Barket said.

Jim ...Pfeiffenberger [and his wife] ...said that was one of the most important parts of the day for their family.

"It helps us to get ideas and exchange ideas, learn what might have worked for someone that may work for our child," [Mrs.] Pfeiffenberger said.

Mennig also said the more relaxed and informal atmosphere of the picnics, compared to society meetings, was helpful.

"They can relax, they can meet others and just socialize a little more naturally," Mennig said.

Eidinov ...thinks events like this help parents come together and celebrate their children.

"Everybody loves their kids," Eidinov said. "It's a great day for all of us to know we're not alone. We're not the only ones."

The society meets monthly...
Here is a link to photos of the SCAS' annual sensory picnic from over six years ago: republicanherald.mycapture.com/mycapture/folder.asp?iframe=1&event=1085068&CategoryID=52561/


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Old February 16th, 2017, 11:11 AM   #662
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in eastern Pennsylvania.

The Arc of Lehigh and Northampton Counties, based in the Lehigh Valley area of Pennsylvania, is a nonprofit whose mission is to advocate, educate, and provide services and support for people with various challenges, including children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The Arc of Lehigh and Northampton Counties has hosted a 'Wings for Autism' event for the past couple of years...
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Families of autistic children will have an opportunity next month to practice air travel without ever leaving the ground.

The Arc of Northampton and Lehigh counties partnered with Lehigh Valley International Airport and Allegiant Air to organize "Wings for Autism." It's geared toward autistic children...

The event is based on a pilot program developed by the Arc of the United States and completed at large hubs across the country, including Logan International Airport in Boston, according to Bruce Seidel, development director for Arc of Lehigh and Northampton counties.

In planning since last November, Wings for Austism will be held May 9, and the program was at capacity within a day or two after registration opened, Seidel said. The event was limited to about 240 participants because it involves boarding a jet, he said.

Airline travel, particularly the lengthy security check process, is something that those with [various challenges including Autism Spectrum Disorders] can find very challenging, often preventing families from traveling, Seidel said. The Wings for Autism event will allow families to simulate the process of air travel, he said.

Families are scheduled to arrive at the Allegiant ticketing desk at 9 a.m. to begin the process. From there, they will go through a regular security screening process and make their way through the terminal.

Passengers will board an airplane that will taxi down a runway, offering as complete an experience as possible, Seidel said.

The event will include more than 40 volunteers to assist families along the way, offering information on how to handle certain situations. It could be something simple a family never considered, such as bringing along headphones to combat the noise associated with takeoff, Seidel said.

"In the event they plan to travel, this gives them real-life experience about where their family member, who has a disability, has trouble along the trail," he said.

There are many "moving parts" in organizing an event like this, and organizers are just trying to get through the first one, Seidel said. But based on the tremendous interest in this event, Arc is already considering a second program, he said.


...As the Lehigh Valley continues to evolve and become more diverse, programs like next month's Wings for Autism can lend to that growth, Seidel said. As large employers, for instance, recruit to the area, that may include families of children with a developmental disability, he said.

"In the consideration process for accepting a job here, a big factor is what kind of community am I moving to," Seidel said. "What services and programs are available?"...
Here is a link to photos on the nonprofit's 'Wings for Autism' event, held at Lehigh Valley International Airport (ABE), from a couple of years ago: https://www.flickr.com/photos/thearc...7650414468394/


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Old February 18th, 2017, 10:26 AM   #663
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in eastern Pennsylvania.

Dragonfly Forest is a Conshohocken, Pennsylvania-based nonprofit that provides overnight camping experiences for children with various challenges, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. The nonprofit provides a full Autism Summer Program for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders...
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Last summer, 8-year-old Scott Jones was nervous about going to sleep away camp for the first time--especially about being away from his mom. But after a week filled with swimming, boating, hiking, ...games, and arts and crafts at Dragonfly Forest camp in West Chester, Pennsylvania, Scott had such a great time that he wanted to go back the next week--and the one after that.

This type of experience is just what the camp aims to give: one where kids with disabilities, including those with autism, like Scott, can enjoy an unforgettable week. "Generally speaking, when you ask people about their most favorite memories, they're not in therapy, or school, or in the classroom," says Sylvia van Meerten, the camp's program director. "Their favorite memories are when they were intentionally pulled away from life to have fun. We're here to do just that--give them a week based on fun."

Founded in 2001, Dragonfly Forest offers free summer sessions ...and in TK year expanded to provide a session for children on the autism spectrum as well...

Now, the yearly session attracts nearly 200 campers, on all ranges of the spectrum, from Pennsylvania and neighboring states. (And the program is quickly expanding to include after-school sessions...)

The staff takes pride when visitors say it looks like a 'regular camp,'...

The camp includes facilities you would find at many traditional camps: dorm-style housing, a 14-acre lake, a rope elements course, a zip line, tennis courts, hiking trails, a gym, and an arts and theater center.
But the staff does take measures to make sure Dragonfly Forest is well suited to kids on the spectrum. The key: to relieve their anxiety in social situations, says van Meerten. Kids with autism have a hard time picking up social cues and predicting what will happen next, which can make them anxious and nervous, she explains. "A typical person would feel anxious in a different culture where things don't make sense," van Meerten explains. "Kids with autism feel like that all the time in everyday life."
To alleviate this stress, the staff provides information booklets before camp starts, sticks to schedules, and offers detailed explanations before every activity and meals so campers know what to expect. (Van Meerten even gave out her personal email to answer last-minute questions before the start of the session.)
Counselors, who are trained each summer for four to seven days, are assigned to an individual camper for the session, with a counselor/camper ratio of 2:1...

And it's not just the kids' stress that Dragonfly hopes to relieve--the program is free in an effort to ease the financial burden for families.

...And possibly the biggest plus of all: Once camp is over, the kids head home with a newfound sense of confidence and independence...

Case in point: Scott wouldn't try the zip line at a friend's house before Dragonfly. After conquering the zip line over the summer, the family added a mini-zip line to the backyard. "[Scott] is the kind of kid that hangs back and assesses the situation," his mother Rebecca says. "His hang-back time is a little bit shorter now."
Here is a link to a video from Dragonfly Forest from last year:


Last edited by Visionary7903; August 23rd, 2017 at 10:48 AM.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 07:33 PM   #664
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Default Re: 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

After a 6 year thread length and no other member replying, what has this to do with pheromones?
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Old May 14th, 2017, 07:44 PM   #665
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Default Re: 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

Hi Wotan. In the lounge section, off-topic threads are tolerated. This thread has an important number of views, I guess it's interesting for many people.
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Old May 14th, 2017, 08:18 PM   #666
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Default Re: 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

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Originally Posted by Conjurator View Post
Hi Wotan. In the lounge section, off-topic threads are tolerated. This thread has an important number of views, I guess it's interesting for many people.
Ah. Okay. I read through a few pages expecting something about using pheromones as a treatment for autism.
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Old September 20th, 2017, 12:57 PM   #667
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in Pennsylvania.

The PaTTAN (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network) Autism Initiative is committed to helping educators and parents better meet the educational needs of children and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Through the PaTTAN Autism Initiative, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents are taught the principals of Applied Behavioural Analysis and learn how to implement those principals in the classroom and at home...
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Parents will go to great lengths to do what is best for their children. A recent visitor to the West Chester Area School District is proof positive of that sentiment.
This past March, Exton Elementary Autistic Support teacher Nicole Verbos and her staff hosted an Applied Behavioral Analyst from the Czech Republic. Dita Chapman was in the United States visiting autistic support classrooms in Pennsylvania that operate under the guidance of the PaTTAN Autism Initiative. The initiative is overseen by the State Department of Education and is designed to support the efforts and initiatives of the Bureau of Special Education.

...According to the State Department of Education, ABA is a scientific approach to behavior. Its principles are used to change and improve behaviors. ABA principles and procedures can be used with all students to provide positive reinforcement, to teach and maintain appropriate behaviors, and to provide immediate feedback during instruction.
Frustrated by the lack of resources in Prague to properly educate her 8-year-old son, who has autism, Dr. Jana Gandalovicova, a cardiologist, heard about the PaTTAN Autism Initiative and decided to do something to help autistic children in the Czech Republic. Dr. Gandalovicova hired Chapman to come to the United States and observe classrooms in Pennsylvania that operate under the PaTTAN Autism Initiative with the ultimate goal of replicating the model in the Czech Republic.
"Children in the Czech Republic who have been diagnosed with autism basically have two options," said Chapman. "They can either go into mainstream classrooms, which is not ideal because the teachers have no idea what to do with these children. They can't teach them, so the kids end up learning nothing. The other option is to go to a special education school where the children are very low functioning. There is really nothing in between."
"My trip here is because of one mother's struggle to find suitable education for her child -- one very dedicated mother who wants to make a change in our country," continued Chapman. "Dr. Gandalovicova researched the PaTTAN Autism Initiative and presented it to the Ministry of Education in Prague. They told her 'This is a great idea. Let's give it a try.' "
The PaTTAN Autism Initiative uses visual supports and research-based, data-driven, proven interventions. Mrs. Verbos' classroom is described as a model classroom by Amiris Dipuglia and Mike Miklos, lead consultants with the PaTTAN Autism Initiative.
In addition to Mrs. Verbos' classroom, there are autistic learning support classrooms at East Goshen Elementary School, Fern Hill Elementary School, Fugett Middle School, Stetson Middle School, and Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School. The teachers at those schools also operate under the PaTTAN Autism Initiative. They have seen significant progress in their students and are dedicated to making a difference in their lives.
One of the first tools one notices when they walk into Mrs. Verbos' classroom is a busy, yet extremely organized bulletin board filled with the names of her students and staff along with daily activities. All of the information lives on laminated pieces of paper that are attached to velcro to allow for easy scheduling of each day. Mrs. Verbos begins her day in front of the board arranging the pieces as if she were putting together a puzzle.
"The schedule makes everybody accountable for what they are doing," said Verbos. "Everyone knows where they need to be and when. Everything is color coordinated."
The upcoming school year will mark Verbos' fifth year in the PaTTAN Initiative. Dipuglia and Miklos, who have been with Verbos from the beginning, have nothing but high praise for her and all of her efforts.
"A teacher like Nicole Verbos has developed an independence in selecting programs and in training her staff to teach effectively. She strongly monitors student progress so that our efforts here in the classroom are not as necessary as they would be in some other classes because Nicole has developed independence in the analysis," said Dipuglia.
"She is a model classroom," continued Dipuglia. "It's a feather in the hat of the West Chester Area School District to have nurtured a teacher like Nicole. Exton Principal Dr. Terri-Lynne Alston, Special Education Supervisor Lisa Phifer, Special Education Liaison Kate Feryo, and district administration have been so supportive of Nicole's efforts, and they worked to understand how to best support her."
Mrs. Verbos bounces around her classroom with a level of energy that would make the Energizer Bunny envious. She constantly thinks about her students and how she can improve their learning experience. Her ability to apply what she has learned through the PaTTAN Autism Initiative to help her students is remarkable.
"Nicole is unique," said Chapman. "She gets it. She gets the whole science. She gets how everything works. She is super fun and motivating. She is a great leader. I think the most amazing thing about her is even when she is concentrating on one student, her eyes and ears are everywhere. She knows exactly what's going on in every corner of her classroom while she is still working with one student intensively."
"Seeing what is happening here in Pennsylvania has been so encouraging," added Chapman. "I come from the field of behavioral analysis, which is very complex. What the people at PaTTAN have done is manage to take something that is very difficult and complex and turn it into something simple that teachers and support staff can implement. I have not seen a single person in any of the classrooms that I've visited that wasn't able to follow the protocol."
According to Dipuglia and Miklos, there are about 550 classrooms statewide that operate under the PaTTAN Initiative.
"I think the amount of schools across the nation that are employing methods of teaching derived from Applied Behavioral Analysis is increasing dramatically," said Miklos. "What is unique about Pennsylvania is that we have developed ways of using ABA that are geared towards making it easier for teachers to implement. We've produced training materials and other resources that allow teachers to acquire the basic concepts of ABA and employ them in a more efficient manner."
The alternative to the PaTTAN Initiative and ABA is a more eclectic approach that many parents of autistic children wind up turning to out of desperation when they feel that nothing is working.
"The problem with an eclectic approach is that it tends to lead towards a lack of consistency," added Miklos. "It leads to a lack of programs that build systematically from one step to another. If we can teach teachers ways of interacting that carefully build skills in a systematic way we believe we have a powerful tool to assist children in becoming more independent, more productive members of society and actually being more successful in their interactions with people within their school and their community."
"In our society, I think there is a tendency to look at quick and easy fixes," continued Miklos. "This has resulted in the propagation of many interventions that may be, at some level, questionable. Parents love their kids, they care about their kids, and they want to do what's best. I think ultimately the answer is education and also making sure that when we are teaching, we're really looking at providing verifiable outcomes. If that doesn't happen, then we should be doing something else. There is no intervention that is always going to be successful."
Carolyn Snyder's son William is a student in Mrs. Verbos' class. When William turned two, his pediatrician told Snyder to prepare for an autism diagnosis, which he eventually received. She constantly battles the nagging thought of --'am I doing everything possible to help my child?' Before enrolling at Exton Elementary School, William attended an early intervention school in Delaware. Teachers told Snyder that she shouldn?t expect too much out of her son. After removing William from the school, the family began their journey to find a school where William could thrive, and they found it at Exton.
"One of the things that we were impressed with was how we immediately started noticing changes in his behavior at home," said Snyder. "Previously when he wanted something, and we could not figure out what he wanted he would cry. Now, he was starting to ask us and show us what he wanted. We knew we had made the right decision about this school."
"Even with the words he has, there is a painful quietness with my son. I longed to hear him tell me anything," Snyder added. "Rides in the car were so quiet. I used to be very irritated when mothers complained about their child talking all the time. There was one thing I wanted to hear above all else -- for him to say I love you. He could repeat the words, but he had never said them on his own without being told to. One day within a few months of starting kindergarten, my son and I were cuddling. I told him 'I love you' and he said 'I love you too.' I told everybody at work that my six-year-old told me 'I love you.' I must have seemed like a nut as none of those people understood the significance."
"I feel very lucky that I am living in an area where the Autism Initiative exists and there are people like Nicole Verbos and her staff as well as Amiris Dipuglia who care so much and expect these children to succeed," said Snyder.
Dita Chapman has returned to Prague and is in the process of implementing all of the techniques she observed while in Pennsylvania. Once everything is set up, and staff members are trained, she will remain in the classroom daily to ensure the program runs as smoothly as possible.
"We are going to set up the first classroom and start small," said Chapman. "Our first year will be a trial run. We will see how it goes. I don't know if people realize how lucky you are, but what you have in Pennsylvania, what PaTTAN is doing, is state of the art education for children on the (autism) spectrum. This is like nothing else on the whole planet."
Mike Miklos and Amiris Dipuglia plan to visit Chapman in Prague in October to observe her progress...
Here is a link to a video on the Initiative on 'Tacts of Actions: Teaching Noun-Verb Combinations': Tacts of Actions: Teaching Noun-Verb Combinations - PaTTAN


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