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Old July 9th, 2016, 07:54 AM   #571
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Columbus metropolitan area of Ohio.

Ohio's state capital, like most other major cities in North America, is home to an annual 'Walk Now for Autism Speaks'. The event acts as a fundraiser and awareness event for Autism Speaks, North America's leading Autism science and advocacy organisation...
Quote:
More than 17,000 walkers participated in the 7th Annual Columbus Walk Now for Autism Speaks on Sunday... To date, the event has raised more than $1,040,000 in support of Autism Speaks’ mission to fund research, increase awareness and family services and advocate for individuals with autism and their families.

The sun was shining. Walkers came out in their best team t-shirts. Families came out in the thousands to show their support of [those] on the autism spectrum. With nearly 40 service providers in the resource fair and family friendly activities from the Clippers and Home Depot, walkers of all ages ...had fun while learning more about autism services in Central Ohio.

To get the walk kicked off, shout outs were given to local sponsors and corporate partners such as E-Cycle as well as check presentations from two of Columbus’ largest supporters Covelli Enterprises/Panera Bread and White Castle.
Thank you to the 2014 Columbus Walk Now for Autism Speaks Planning Committee, sponsors, service providers, families, and the countless volunteers that made the walk a day that everyone could celebrate and advocate for those we love on the spectrum!
Here is a link to a video on the 2014 Columbus, Ohio 'Walk Now for Autism Speaks':


Last edited by Visionary7903; July 10th, 2016 at 08:06 AM.
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Old July 10th, 2016, 08:07 AM   #572
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Default Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Columbus metropolitan area of Ohio.

To the west, Dayton Children's Hospital is a Dayton, Ohio-based not-for-profit pediatric hospital. Dayton Children’s Autism Diagnostic Center provides screening tests for children younger than 5 years to determine whether behaviours are consistent with Autism Spectrum Disorders...
Quote:
Dayton Children’s Hospital became a second home to Kevin Teall [the general manager of the Panera Bread bakery-cafe] and his wife, Dominique, after the birth of their twins in 2012...

So when Panera Bread launched its “Pieces of Hope for Autism” cookie campaign, benefitting Dayton Children’s autism diagnostic center, Kevin jumped onboard. “Everyone at the hospital was like family to us as we learned Aiden would have some special needs so it’s wonderful to help support the hospital,” he says. “I feel fortunate to work for Panera Bread, a company that is committed to charity fundraising for the great organizations in our community.”

The “Pieces of Hope for Autism” cookie campaign runs from April 13 through April 19. Puzzle Piece Shortbread cookies will be available in all 11 Dayton, Ohio, Panera Bread bakery-cafes. 100% of proceeds from all cookie sales will be donated to Dayton Children’s Hospital autism diagnostic center. The donation will be used to help fund programs that will provide timely diagnostic assessment for families who are concerned about their child having autism as well ongoing education and support to primary care physicians to assist them in the identification and management of children with autism.

Kevin says the effort is bigger than a bake sale. “I have seen amazing acts of kindness this week.

People have been paying it forward – paying for the next person in line in the drive-thru. One woman who had never come to a Panera Bread bakery-cafe before saw the cookie campaign and was floored by the effort. It was personal for her because her son has autism.”

Kevin’s twin sons are now two years old, and his family which also includes four year old son Noah and wife Dominique, are the light of his life.

He’s made it his personal goal to sell 3,000 cookies ...to support Dayton Children’s, an unequaled feat. His team is well on their way. A chalkboard sign spells out the effort and keeps a running tally of the number of cookies sold – they are almost halfway to the goal.
Here is a link to a video from Dayton Children's Hospital:





Last edited by Visionary7903; July 13th, 2016 at 06:54 AM.
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Old July 13th, 2016, 06:49 AM   #573
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of the last couple of posts has been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Dayton metropolitan area of Ohio.

Roads to Recovery is a Fairborn, Ohio-based nonprofit dedicated to helping children with Autism Spectrum Disorders find individualised solutions. Its activities include organising free gym parties for younger children (6-9 year-olds) with Autism Spectrum Disorders...
Quote:
There are few things more treasured than the companionship of a good friend. But for children living with autism, the process of forging friendships can be especially difficult.

For those on the autism spectrum, social cues are sometimes misunderstood and new people and experiences can feel overwhelming. As parents, we want all children, no matter what their abilities, to feel valued and included. How can you help achieve this? By teaching your kids about autism and showing them how to reach out to children on the spectrum in the classroom and beyond.

...Leigha Herrmann, an autism therapist with Roads to Recovery, a Dayton area learning and resource center for children with autism and their families, stresses two small but important words: "Just try." Herrmann suggests parents talk with their children about the unique hurdles they may stumble upon when befriending a child on the autism spectrum. "Some kids will not necessarily respond upon the first greeting," she explains.

It's not that children with autism don't want to communicate. Often, Herrmann says, it's a matter of patience and persistence. "Many times, I have been disheartened to see well-intentioned parents of 'typical' children shunning their child from 'pressing' an initially unresponsive peer." Parents are sometimes quick to advise their child to leave the child on the spectrum alone, when in reality, persistence may be just the key.

"I have seen children with autism, who struggle with language, blossom with a bit of persistence," Herrmann says. "Don't give up! Both children benefit from the encounter. The best way to learn is by doing." Before having a play date with a child with special needs, talk with your child about what strategies they can use to help make the experience go well.

...Outside the classroom, some children on the spectrum face difficulty getting involved with activities outside the normal routine. The national Autism Speaks website recommends planning ahead with the child's input to help lessen stress. For kids and parents who are trying to reach out to a child on the spectrum, this could mean trying to extend play date and party invitations as early as possible, and to provide plenty of details about what the child can expect. Lauren agrees with this sentiment and stresses that like most children, those on the spectrum do want to enjoy new friends and experiences. "It's helpful to us when we have plenty of advance notice," she explains. "Parents can encourage their kids to think ahead when it comes to including a child on the spectrum — try to ask way ahead of time for a play date."

...When it comes to autism and other labels, 'person first language' is important. It is more respectful to say a child has autism versus referring to them as an autistic child. This is considered more respectful and accurate, since autism is only one aspect of a child's whole being. The word 'spectrum' is used to describe autism because how it manifests in different people can vary greatly.

...Dayton is home to several high-quality organizations focused on programs for children on the spectrum and their families. In addition to the previously mentioned Roads to Recovery center, the Dayton Autism Society and Dayton Children's Hospital (which has recently opened a new autism diagnostic center) also provide autism support and community outreach. Do you know a child with autism? Reach out to them! Your friendship can enrich their lives as well as your own.
Here is a link to a video from the Roads to Recovery golf outing from about a month ago: https://www.facebook.com/RoadsToReco...0578204006324/


Last edited by Visionary7903; July 14th, 2016 at 10:39 AM.
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Old July 17th, 2016, 12:09 PM   #574
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Dayton metropolitan area of Ohio.

Goodwill Easter Seals Miami Valley (GESMV) is a Dayton, Ohio-based nonprofit thatserves people with various challenges, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, in 23 Ohio counties and numerous local communities. GESMV offers a 'Sign Language for Autism' program...
Quote:
...Lindsay O'Neill, diagnosed with autism at age three, struggled to communicate her wants and needs; this is one of the most challenging aspects of autism for parents, caregivers and teachers.

Through the Sign Language for Autism program offered by [GESMV], Lindsay and her family have been working to increase communication with the use of sign language.

Prior to entering the program, Lindsay communicated primarily in a 'physical' manner. She would take things to her parents to indicate her wants and needs or lead her parents to what interested her. She was able to say a few practical words but she was often frustrated when she was misunderstood.

"The goal of our program is to help children with autism communicate by using signs to create a bridge to spoken language," said Melissa Engle, Sign Language for Autism program coordinator. "By pairing signs with spoken words, children with autism begin to understand that signs have meaning."

Determining Lindsay's favorite things and interests was the first step. Then Lindsay was taught five signs each week. The signs were paired with her favorite things to have more reinforcement.

"Lindsay took to sign language very fast," Melissa said. "In fact, we had her parents and her tutors signing many more signs to Lindsay as they spoke. Lindsay became focused on hands and quickly understood that sign language has meaning."

Over the past several months, Lindsay has learned to get her wants and needs met utilizing sign language. When her parents and tutors use sign language, Lindsay voices the signs. She has increased her words and her verbal approximations have improved. She is using more words instead of a strictly physical means to interact.

"Lindsay is a delightful five-year-old girl with jubilant energy," Melissa said. "She is bright, creative and a joy to be around."
Here is a link to a video on the story:


Last edited by Visionary7903; July 19th, 2016 at 08:33 AM.
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Old July 18th, 2016, 10:06 AM   #575
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Dayton metropolitan area of Ohio.

Safe Haven Farms is a Madison Township, Ohio-based nonprofit offering residential, day and community services for individuals on the Autism Spectrum. Safe Haven Farms' therapeutic riding program is for those on the Autism Spectrum, including children, from the surrounding community...
Quote:
...Recently the farm received three donated horses for the equestrian program

...Experience has shown that caring for and riding horses has significant therapeutic benefits for people with autism and Safe Haven is pleased to be able to offer it.

The horses are currently being acclimated to their new environment and instructors are being trained and certified.

Donna Farler, Equestrian Program Coordinator, reports that each horse currently displays good temperament, which is critical to working well with the residents, future riders and volunteers.

"The horses remain quiet around people and in different surroundings and can tolerate a number of active people around them as they work," explained Donna.

"They don't spook easily and need to be willing to carry riders who may be unbalanced, sometimes wiggly or loud.

"Volunteers are needed to work as side helpers and horse leaders.

The side helpers will assist the riders and need no previous horse experience, but need to feel comfortable around horses.

The horse leaders will assist riders with grooming and tacking their horse.

They also lead the horse during the lessons.

Our leaders must have prior equestrian experience, although additional training will be provided at the farm.

Horse 'angels' are also needed — experienced riders who will be trained to exercise horses and keep them fit...
Here is a link to photos from the Safe Haven Farms 'Walk On for Autism Fundraiser' from last year: Walk On for Autism Fundraiser 2015


Last edited by Visionary7903; July 21st, 2016 at 09:21 AM.
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Old July 20th, 2016, 07:10 AM   #576
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Dayton metropolitan area of Ohio.

The Dayton Autism Society (DAS) is a Dayton, Ohio-based nonprofit which exists to advocate for, support, and educate families living with Autism Spectrum Disorders. DAS serves those living in the greater Miami Valley area with Autism Spectrum Disorders, including Montgomery, Miami, Greene, Darke, Clark, Preble, Warren, and other neighboring counties...
Quote:
Families got a chance to splash around and raise awareness for Autism in Vandalia Saturday.

Families enjoyed a pool party at the Vandalia Rec Center.

The Dayton Autism Society organized the event.

...Since autism typically impacts social interaction and communication skills, Families love seeing the kids thrive in this type of environment where they're free to express themselves.

"The smiles, seeing kids that might struggle through the majority of the day, seeing those pure, happy smiles,” said Elizabeth Redmon.

The Society puts on an event once a month.
Here is a link to a short video from this year's Dayton Autism Society's 'Walk-Run 4 Autism Awareness' in Moraine, Ohio from a few months ago: https://www.facebook.com/13479137720...3602510537205/

(source: WKEF Top Stories)

Last edited by Visionary7903; July 21st, 2016 at 09:31 AM.
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Old July 21st, 2016, 10:24 AM   #577
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Dayton metropolitan area of Ohio.

To the south, Cincinnati is home to its own annual 'Walk Now for Autism Speaks', the nonprofit that is North America's leading Autism science and advocacy organisation. The event is held at the Coney Island amusement park and waterpark located 10 miles east of Downtown Cincinnati...
Quote:
More than 7,000 attendees participated in our 9th Annual Cincinnati Autism Speaks Walk on Saturday, May 14th at Coney Island.

Teams, families, and volunteers enjoyed performances by Fly High Dance, Zak Morgan, Billy Brown, as well as opening announcements led by emcees Jeff and Jenn from Q102.

To date, the event has raised more than $145,000 in support of Autism Speaks' mission to fund research, increase awareness and family services and advocate for individuals with autism and their families.

Thank you to our sponsors and partners Q102, Hillman Group, Toyota, Nestle, Summit Academy, White Castle, and LPK.

...THANK YOU TO EVERYONE FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

Your donation can be designated to a specific individual, team or event.

All walkers raising $150 or more will receive a commemorative T-shirt on Walk Day. We are happy to reserve one for you!
Here is a link to a video from Cincinnati, Ohio's 'Walk Now for Autism Speaks' from seven years ago:


Last edited by Visionary7903; July 31st, 2016 at 08:36 AM.
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Old July 22nd, 2016, 08:24 AM   #578
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of yesterday's post was Cincinnati being home to its own annual 'Walk Now for Autism Speaks', the nonprofit that is North America's leading Autism science and advocacy organisation. The event is held at the Coney Island amusement park and waterpark located 10 miles east of Downtown Cincinnati.

West Chester, Ohio-based ABC Pediatric Therapy Network lives it’s mission of 'creating the best life for all children' by providing the highest quality of speech, physical, and occupational therapy in a child friendly environment. ABC's child-directed approach is fun for kids, including those with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and helps them achieve their goals faster than more traditional therapy methods...
Quote:
For the two women who own ABC Pediatric Therapy Network, it's all about balance.
There is, of course, the most literal meaning: Children who come for treatment at the West Chester-based company ­- which provides physical, occupational and speech therapy - sometimes work on balance issues, among many others.

But the balance theme goes way beyond that. CEO Susan Baenziger and CFO Diane Crecelius, both working mothers, are constantly balancing those competing demands. And in a female-dominated profession, they face the challenge of providing a flexible work environment for their employees while meeting the needs of the company. Not to mention the biggest balancing act of all: Trained as therapists and not business owners, they've struggled to marry their love of treating patients with all the hundreds of details that go into running a business.
It isn't always easy, they say, but it's always rewarding. And it seems to be working.

...What might look simply like funky swings, trampolines, climbing areas and wooden playsets actually provide opportunities for kids to improve everything from muscle control and gravitational insecurity to sensory issues and language challenges, said Crecelius. Both women say what they think sets ABC apart is the extremely child-friendly environment, different than a typical hospital or doctors office setting.

"Kids don't really realize they're going there for therapy. They think they're going there for fun," said Baenziger.

...The co-owners for years have met regularly with doctors, asking them what they're hearing from patients, what needs aren't being met and how they can help educate doctors on how they work. "We want the doctors to let us know if they hear feedback about us, that someone was not helpful on the phone or whatever it is, so we can improve," said Crecelius.
Here is a link to a ABC Pediatric Therapy television spot:



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Old July 23rd, 2016, 07:39 AM   #579
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of yesterday's post was the West Chester, Ohio-based ABC Pediatric Therapy Network, which lives it's mission of 'creating the best life for all children' by providing the highest quality of speech, physical, and occupational therapy in a child friendly environment. ABC's child-directed approach is fun for kids, including those with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and helps them achieve their goals faster than more traditional therapy methods...

ABC has teamed up with the Great Miami Valley YMCA, and the Joe Nuxhall Miracle League Fields to create a baseball program for the special needs community, including children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The Joe Nuxhall Miracle League Fields is a Fairfield, Ohio-based nonprofit that is not a place, rather it's a team of people — a lot of people, dedicated to the idea that "Every kid, with every challenge, should get every chance to play baseball"...
Quote:
...The complex at 4850 Groh Lane celebrated its grand opening Saturday. with about a half-dozen kids emerging from the corn planted around the ball field — a tip of the hat to the movie 'Field of Dreams.' Combing through the corn with the kids was Sean Casey, a former first baseman for the Cincinnati Reds.
"There's some bugs in that corn, I just want to let you know," Casey said, smiling after he trotted on to the field, a $3 million project that brought in about $2.5 million in donated materials, said Kim Nuxhall, Joe's son, who had to hold back tears more than once.
"We persevered, and the cream has risen to the top," he said. "Thank you for making these fields of dreams fields of reality."
After Nuxhall's opening remarks came his ceremonial first pitch, thrown very high, causing Casey to have to stretch to catch it. Then, for the first time, dozens of special needs kids from Warren and Butler counties took the field, playing the first youth exhibition game.
One team was from Warren County, the other team was from Butler County. No official score was kept, as the kids were playing strictly for the fun of it. The field has a rubberized surface that makes it easy for kids in wheelchairs to 'run' the bases. It also lessens the chance of injury should anyone fall. Playing with wiffle balls, some kids batted off of a tee.
The first at-bat of the game was Tyler Wooley, who played on the Warren County team, who wheeled his chair to first base — then wheeled it back to home, to the delight of the crowd.

...Some of the kids were as young as 5, such as Josh and Aidan Petredids of Fairfield, twins who are both autistic. Before the game, Aidian was having fun sitting in the ball container, playing with the multi-colored wiffle balls. He also got a chance to hit one of them and run toward base during the game.
"It's neat to see them get a chance to do this," said their grandfather, Mike Delehanty.
Kristy Preston-Stagg, the spokeswoman for the Miracle League, said Saturday's event drew about 2,000 people even before the evening fireworks show.
"It was better than we could have ever imagined. We've very proud of everyone who made this dream come true. It's a miracle, I should say."
Those who want information about joining a league or volunteering can call (513) 829-NUXY for more information. The Great Miami Valley YMCA is handling the youth leagues, for ages 5 [and over]...
Here is a link to a video on this program:


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Old July 24th, 2016, 08:32 AM   #580
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of the last few posts has been on Autism-related events and organisations in the Cincinnati metropolitan area of Ohio.

The Cincinnati Center For Autism (CCA) is a Cincinnati, Ohio-based non-profit that was formed with the sole purpose of improving the outcome for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. CCA is committed to offering a variety of programs which address communication, education, social, and behavioural needs of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, to assure that they are able to achieve happy, fulfilling lives...
Quote:
..."He had met every developmental milestone on time or early, upper end of growth chart, chubby, healthy," said Vicki Sotack.

Sotack's now 6-year-old son Nathan who went to the doctor and received shots when he was one.

"Within about five hours of that fateful day's well check, he lost his ability to speak," said Sotack.

Nathan goes to school at the Mason Early Childhood Learning Center.

He can communicate using a device that also lets him playgames and read. He does not speak and in spite of therapy and cross country trips to doctors, autism won't ease its grip.

Sotack continues to search for answers for her son.

A group at the Cincinnati Center for Autism in Fairfield are taking a break from school at the best room in the house — the swing room.

"The story is that there's no known cause and no known cure forautism," said Amanda Tipkemper-Sparks, Executive Director at the Cincinnati Center for Autism.

Tipkemper Sparks says their job is to concentrate on the present and the possibilities with the whole family.

"The only thing we can do as professionals is support that family in the process of grief, healing, moving on and seeking treatment," added Tipkemper Sparks...
Here is a link to a video showing the Cincinnati Center For Autism in action: https://www.facebook.com/parish.rc/videos/76893523023/


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