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Old February 23rd, 2016, 08:12 AM   #511
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of the recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Easter Seals Therapeutic School and Center for Autism in Rockford, Illinois is part of the nonprofit, Easter Seals Metropolitan Chicago. The goals of Easter Seals Autism Therapeutic Schools are to empower each student to achieve peak academic performance, increase social and vocational skills, develop an effective means of communication and foster the acquisition of functional life skills for independence in the community...
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...For Autism Awareness Month we take a look at a local school that's helping autistic kids overcome challenges.

"I'm too shy," says 9-year-old Eli McKinley who has autism. His mother Kim didn't officially find out until he was 3-years-old.

Kim McKinley said, "I think I was in denial, I thought 'these people are seeing things I don't see' but by the time he was three there were so many differences that deep down I knew."

Kim says as Eli got older, school became difficult for him.

...They're all things that have changed. Eli's behavior has improved since transferring from his public school ...to Easter Seals Autism Therapeutic School in Rockford.

Jacque Ruch from Easter Seals Autism Therapeutic School said, "Children with autism often have very good levels of skills but they have splinter skills pieces that are missing and so we work on filling in the blanks."

The unemployment rate for people with disabilities is 80 percent. That's why Easter Seals works with kids to develop skills at a young age.

Ruch said, "We look at the whole child, what is their outcome, where are they going to live as an adult what kind of education, work skills life skills, all of those things we address even when we get children at 5."

Teachers address those issues in small classes with a maximum of six students with a goal of reintegrating kids back into their home schools.

Easter Seals is free for parents. School Districts pay for the tuition. The center serves 26 different school districts and serves kids from three...
Here is a link to photos of the main annual fundraiser for the school, the 'Easter Seals Walk With Me Rockford', from about 15 months ago: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...2937496&type=3

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Old February 24th, 2016, 05:41 AM   #512
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of the recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Burr Ridge, Illinois-based By Your Side Autism Therapy Services serves the needs of individuals with Autism by providing a multidisciplinary team of speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, and board certified behavior analysts in a variety and/or combination of settings: center, home, and schools. By Your Side Autism Therapy Services has been an exhibitor at the annual 'Chicago Autism Walk' hosted by the nonprofit organisation, Autism Speaks; By Your Side had a booth providing information about its services to the Autism community and fun sensory activities for kids...
Quote:
...Less than three years ago, By Your Side opened a unique autism language center that offers therapy in an home environment.

Two months ago, they opened a second center and they expect it to grow rapidly with amazing outcomes.

The new By Your Side center is located in Schaumburg.

"We started with Burr Ridge and Ridge really grew by leaps and bounds and we were getting a lot of demands from some of the suburbs from up here in this area," said executive director Julie Martin.

"We were fortunate to be able to open the second one.

"We specialize in children with autism, but we do work with kids with other disabilities. We have majority speech therapists on staff and behavior therapists on staff. We're able to meet other needs, and one of the things we always tell people we are an autism-specific center."

This center focuses on social functions.

"We want you to learn how you're going to do things in your house, which is why we made all this look like rooms in your house," Martin said. "We want you to learn to sit around the kitchen table, to sit around the TV and family room, play the Wii and play with your siblings."

Ron and Eunice McConville's son, Chip, is 7 years old. He is autistic.

"He was diagnosed when he was 18 months old," Eunice McConville said. "We just knew because he wasn't talking or really connecting with people."

He started at the Burr Ridge location when it opened and has made great progress.

"He was not verbal and he was very frustrated," Eunice said. "He pushed people quite a bit because he couldn't use words, and now he actually does not."

"He's able to express himself in such a way that he doesn't get as frustrated and he's much happier because he can do that," Ron McConville said.

Christine Sipe's son, Matthew, is 9 years old. He is also autistic. Matthew participates in a social group at the center.

"He has problems with social cues and expressive language and coming here, he has a way to rehearse it," Sipe said. "You know if he's doing something wrong, you know the therapist stops him right there and says this is how you should approach this."

..."We definitely see ourselves growing," Martin said. "We always need a center to kind of settle its roots and as we do that, we want to continue to grow and we will like to continue in the Chicago area."...
Here is a link to a By Your Side video showing creative ways that bubbles can be used in Autism Therapy:



Last edited by Visionary7903; February 24th, 2016 at 05:58 AM.
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Old February 25th, 2016, 06:38 AM   #513
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of the recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Have Dreams (Helping Autistic Voices Emerge) is a Park Ridge, Illinois-based non-profit whose mission is to help individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders learn, function independently and socialise so that they may realise their full potential and develop into contributing members of their communities. Many families refer to Have Dreams as a 'haven of hope' because its extracurricular programs help their child gain important life skills....
Quote:
...children on the autism spectrum are now being identified at a much younger age, sometimes as early as 16 months.

In response to this need, Have Dreams offers the Wee Dream Program. The goal of the program is to foster social and school readiness skills as well as support communication.

The Wee Dream Program is a center based program for the youngest children with autism. This early intervention program helps children 16 months of age through five years to develop skills of attending, waiting, turn-
taking and other important skills to build readiness for their entry to school. Each child is engaged in individualized social learning situations and activities. These learning centers include table games, art, music, circle activities and 1:1 instruction.

Sarah Liddell’s son Franklin started attending Wee Dream when he was only four. “Franklin truly LOVES Have Dreams. Even though he is verbally limited, he fully expresses himself through his actions...and gets extremely giddy, excited, ecstatic every time we even mention Have Dreams! He always eagerly walks then runs into the building every Monday afternoon. He absolutely loves his peers and teachers. ..the sky is the limit with Have Dreams!”

Wee Dream programs also provide opportunities for parents who are dealing with a new diagnosis to meet with professionals to discuss questions or concerns about their child during their child’s class time.

Research has borne out that early intervention programming can help ameliorate the affects of autism.

A six-month, group-based early intervention program with a special emphasis on social development can improve some of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder in children as young as two, according to a study...

“One of the earliest core symptoms of autism is a lack of social imitation [and] toddlers with autism who received this supplemental intervention improved in their ability to imitate others,” Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer of the advocacy group Autism Speaks and a research professor... says in an email. “Even this brief intervention resulted in improvements in at least one aspect of social behavior, namely imitation. This is encouraging because it suggests that relatively small changes due to early preschool programs could be of some benefit to young children with autism.”

With almost 75% of our Wee Dream participants needing some scholarship assistance, Have Dreams relies on community support from our Night of Dreams Gala and grants from the George L. Shields Foundation, Park Ridge Community Fund and the Woman’s Club of Evanston. Our thanks to these organizations and the many individual donors who ensure that early intervention is an option for every child in our community.
Here is a link to photos of the Have Dreams team at the 'Chicago Marathon' from over five years ago: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...4126321&type=3

(source: http://havedreams.org/wp-content/upl...ummer-2014.pdf)

Last edited by Visionary7903; February 25th, 2016 at 07:03 AM.
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Old February 26th, 2016, 08:30 AM   #514
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The post from a couple of days ago mentioned the annual 'Chicago Autism Walk' hosted by the nonprofit organisation, Autism Speaks. Sarah and Shane Hamilton were Chicago Walk Co-Chairs for 2013 and 2014...
Quote:
A South Elgin couple is hoping to bring autism awareness to the [region] as co-chairs of the 10th anniversary Chicago walk for Autism Speaks, a nationwide research and advocacy organization.

Walk Now for Autism Speaks has never been chaired by [local] residents and has always held the majority of its pre-walk events closer to Chicago. Sarah Hamilton and her husband Shane want to change that.

Hamilton said her son Cole, 6, has developmental delays consistent with the autism spectrum -- he was diagnosed four years ago, after which the family connected with Autism Speaks.

"When you first hear that your child is autistic, it's like any other thing -- you don't know what to do," Hamilton said. "You don't know what to do with that information and where you're supposed to go and where to get help."

Once the South Elgin family connected with Autism Speaks, they got a First 100 Days kit to help in the months after the diagnosis and tapped into a network of other parents going through similar issues.

After four years of recruiting a couple dozen friends and family members to participate in the Chicago walk for Autism Speaks, the Hamiltons have stepped up to the plate to lead the organizing.

Two kick off parties are planned for the [region] -- two more than have been held in this area in past years.

"We really hope to bring more awareness to the ...area and understanding of families and people affected by autism," Hamilton said.

...The Chicago walk aims to raise about $1 million for research and advocacy work throughout the year.

The three-mile walk will be held May 18 ...Teams can register for free at any time and volunteers are encouraged to get involved in coming months. The kickoff events will start in March...
Here is a link to photos from the 2014 'Chicago Walk Now for Autism Speaks': https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...5171997&type=3


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Old February 27th, 2016, 06:43 AM   #515
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Little City is a Palatine, Illinois-based non-profit that provides services to individuals with Autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. Serving students from the age of 3 with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well with severe and profound needs on the Autism Spectrum, Little City’s ChildBridge Center for Education provides an adaptive sensory-sensitive facility designed to reduce anxiety...
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[A student with Autism] jumped up and down as he approached the colorful new playground on the campus of Little City Foundation in Palatine.

Without hesitating, he ran up its steps, tried out the slides, and climbed up its miniature rock climbing wall.

Although he is nonverbal and on the autism spectrum, [he] cried out in delight each time he tried out a new piece.

One of his therapists, Brandie Geary, watched him play and breathed a sigh of relief.

"Finally, he has a place to climb where it's appropriate," Geary said. "This is just what he needs."

The 2,500-square foot playground is designed to meet the diverse therapeutic needs of children with autism, with its different sensory zones and soothing environment all wrapped up into one.

It took months of planning, and only moved forward after receiving grants from Discover Financial Services in Riverwoods, and KaBoom!, a Washington D.C.-based nonprofit organization dedicated to creating safe play spaces.

...Vincent Foglioli, 8, approached it somewhat tentatively, but once he tried climbing the steps up to the lower slide and mastering it, he went down, over and over.

Others gravitated toward the swings, while nearly all of them tried out both slides incorporated into the system...
Here is a link to photos from a Little City ChildBridge Center for Education art therapy class from a few years ago: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...8748241&type=3

(source: Autistic-friendly playground at Little City -- Daily Herald)

Last edited by Visionary7903; February 28th, 2016 at 06:25 AM.
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Old February 28th, 2016, 04:52 AM   #516
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

The Northern Illinois Center for Autism (NICA) is a Lake in the Hills, Illinois-based non-profit that provides recreation, resources, services, support and education to families who live with and /or care for a loved one on the Autism Spectrum. NICA serves hundreds of residents where it is located in McHenry County, and the nonprofit also serves families in Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin including: Kane, Lake, Dupage, Winnebago, and Cook counties....
Quote:
Annette Gallagher sits on the steps of the Northern Illinois Center for Autism, waiting for a friend to come unlock its front doors Tuesday, and looks at photos of two of her sons as infants.
The photos show the young boys, Samuel and Mason, looking toward the camera with smiles and no hint of the changes that soon would take over.
Gallagher shares the story of discovering that her sons were autistic with precise detail, mimicking hand movements, glazed eye contact, and unresponsive gestures that signaled the disorder.

...Gallagher puts forth her efforts as president of the Northern Illinois Center for Autism to ensure that families have the resources to live their lives as normally as possible, Gallagher said.
“What we are trying to do is help our families get back to living the life they were supposed to live if their children did not have autism,” Gallagher said. “Get them back out into the world doing what they were supposed to be doing: being social, going out to eat, going to movies, working a job, getting married and having families.
“[It’s] what we all dream of for our typical children...” she said. “We want that for our kids too, and they’re capable if they get the support that they need.”
This year marks the fifth anniversary of the Northern Illinois Center for Autism moving into its center in Lake in the Hills. The center today serves more than 1,250 people and is run entirely by volunteers, Gallagher said.
Since its inauguration, the center has updated its sensory room, which provides the stimuli to prepare some with autism for higher levels of thinking, as well as its fitness room, offices and tutoring room, said Annette Stoner, vice president of the organization.
The Northern Illinois Center for Autism handles people with different levels of autism and is able to reach those who might have been passed up by other systems, Gallagher said.
“Here we’ve got the low functioning because of their severity that will never make it to independence,” Gallagher said. “And we’ve got the high functioning that should be making it to independence but often don’t because they don’t get the help that they need.
“That’s a whole lot of people not making it to an independent level in life, and the economy is going to crumble if we have to support them all,” she said. “And it’s just wrong.”
The center accommodates people of all ages with autism and provides services to help them... The Northern Illinois Center for Autism also teaches family members to provide the proper support to keep the learning going after they leave the center, Gallagher said.

...“[Renting out the banquet hall] is our only source of revenue to help us pay for the center,” Stoner said. “Anything extra that we can collect from our fundraisers also helps provide outside activities ... and helps keep the fees reasonable for the families.”
To continue meeting its members’ needs, the Northern Illinois Center for Autism started applying for grants to hire in-house therapists, to be open full time, and to expand programs.
“I’m often amazed by how long we’ve been there, how many people we’ve served and how many people still don’t know we’re there,” Stoner said. “We do need to provide more outreach to allow other families to come in. With more people, we’ll then need to provide more services and availability.”
This Sunday, the Northern Illinois Center for Autism will host “Rock 4 Autism,” which will include live music, face painting and auctions, among other activities. The event starts at noon... Admission is $15; children 12 years old or younger get in for free.
For 7-year-old Nathan Larsen, whose expressive smile is noticed long before the stumble in his walk caused by autism, the event is another chance to hang out with friends that he has made in the center.
For his mother, Gia Larsen, secretary of the Northern Illinois Center for Autism, it’s the opportunity to keep supporting families like her own.
“We survive based on the help of others,” Larsen said. “We offer programs that no one else in the area offers. … It’s important to keep those types of opportunities open for the community because they wouldn’t have them otherwise.”
Here is a link to a video on the 'Rock 4 Autism' benefit from four years ago for NICA at Cubby Bear North, in Lincolnshire, Illinois:


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Old February 29th, 2016, 05:56 AM   #517
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Easter Seals DFVR is a Villa Park, Illinois-based non-profit that is a leading provider of services for children with disabilities and delays. The non-profit, has opened an Autism Diagnostic Clinic that focuses primarily on very young children...
Quote:
“Being able to identify children within early intervention who have specific impairments or medical conditions helps to get them into appropriate therapies as early in their life as possible, which both improves the children’s long-term outcomes as well as decreasing the stress of the family,” said Dr. Smith.


When Alexis Hersh welcomed twin boys in 2012, she soon realised her boys had developmental delays that led them to Early Intervention.

As the boys did not have a formal diagnosis, their EI Coordinator began to look for a diagnostic clinic.

“We were afraid we would have to travel far, which is hard for us to do, and heard that there are long waiting lists for these clinics,“ said Alexis.

When the Coordinator found the new Medical Diagnostic Clinic at Easter Seals [DFVR], the family was thrilled. It was close to their home in Glen Ellyn and they were able to come in for an appointment quickly.

This new Clinic, formed from an exciting partnership with the university of Chicago and launched in early March, provides long-awaited answers to families whose children have medical complications and delays but do not have a diagnosis.

Developmental-behavioral paediatrician, Dr. Peter Smith, teams with a speech-language pathologist, occupational therapist, developmental therapist and parent liaison from Easter Seals [DFVR] to provide a multi-disciplinary evaluation.

“Working as an interdisciplinary team both improves our “product” the sum is greater than the simple addition of the parts and allows us to learn from each other’s unique skill set,” said Smith.

Alexis first brought two-year-old James into the Clinic who was diagnosed with Autism.

She was nervous to bring in James as he has difficulty with new people.

Her nervousness soon dissolved.

“Everyone was so nice and made us comfortable. I really liked how positive they were too. I think James understood their caring vibes and we really like Dr. Smith,” said Alexis...
Here is a link to photos from an Easter Seals DFVR event at Legoland Discovery Center Chicago from a couple of years ago: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...5344349&type=3

(source: http://www.eastersealsdfvr.org/file/...nal_lowres.pdf)

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Old March 1st, 2016, 05:26 AM   #518
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Alexander Leigh Center for Autism is a Crystal Lake, Illinois-based nonprofit, full day, year-round therapeutic day school approved by the Illinois State Board of Education for children from the ages of 3. The Center's mission is to provide an environment where children on the Autism Spectrum can develop their potential academically, emotionally, socially, communicatively, and physically...
Quote:
...Kelly Weaver... received the news that her two-year-old daughter, Gillian, was severely autistic. Frightened and unsure of what the diagnosis meant, Weaver started researching...

...“I always tell people to trust their parent gut,” Weaver says. “Never give up, and do whatever it takes to provide the way for your child.”

...Weaver teamed up with another mom, Dorie Hoevel, who was homeschooling her own autistic son, Zachary. Together, they decided to create a school to help other parents in the area who were struggling with how to educate their autistic children. “By offering a school, other parents wouldn’t have to hire, fire and train [in-home educators],” Weaver says. “That would all be done for them.”

...After securing funding, forming a nonprofit, developing a board and getting Illinois State Board of Education approval, the school was ready to open in 2007. They added three more children the next year, and today there are 27 children ...attending [Alexander Leigh Center for Autism] (which was named after Gillian “Leigh” and Zachary “Alexander”)...

...Some parents travel over an hour each way every day so that their children can attend this school, where the staff of five teachers and dozens of coaches, therapists, and other experts intimately understands the special academic, social and developmental issues children with autism face in an educational environment.

...the demand for specialized education is high. The non-public [Alexander Leigh Center for Autism] works in partnership with districts to provide appropriate educational programming for students with autism in a highly, intensive therapeutic setting. As [the Center] focuses on children with autism, their programs are designed to fit the individual needs of each child. “[My son] Luke was in the early intervention program at the local public school,” says Tom Bardwil, father of an 8-year-old who has been attending [the Center] for two years. “The school district is well respected and staffed, but Luke was in need of individualized attention. Alexander Leigh was one of three schools that we were able to visit for outplacement. Through one-on-one attention combined with a variety of therapies throughout the school day, Luke has shown progress in life skills, pre-academic skills (he still has a long way to go), and overall improved social behaviors.”...
Here is a link to photos from the Alexander Leigh Center for Autism: Photo Gallery


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Old March 4th, 2016, 10:28 AM   #519
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

Soaring Eagle Academy is a Lombard, Illinois-based nonprofit that offers a new look at children with Autism and related disorders as individuals with great potential for interacting, communicating and thinking. It is the only school to integrate Developmental Language Models and DIR/Floortime approach principles and is dedicated to providing its students, including early childhood aged 3 to 5, with a nurturing social and academic environment which respects their individual differences...
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A new school for children with autism opened last fall offering a an educational-teaching method that is the first of its kind in the Midwest.

The Developmental Individual Difference Relationship-based model, or DIR, is the focus at Soaring Eagle Academy. It promotes social, emotional and intellectual abilities of children with autism.

Located in Burr Ridge, Soaring Eagle Academy only has 10 students.

"Our students have autism spectrum disorder and other related disorders and can be anywhere from moderate to profoundly impaired," said Deanna Tyrpak, one of the school's founders.

"The heart of the DIR model is what's called floor-time and while many look at it as just simple play, it's more than that," said Tyrpak.

"It's amazing process to watch as a parent or a teacher truly engages as a child and gets at their level and meets them where they are, following their lead and their interest while also challenging them and their emotional, their social and their intellectual capacities," said Tyrpak.

"We have a multi-disciplinary team. It's a comprehensive intensive approach. So, there's a special education teacher in the classroom. Every child has a one-on-one assistant that is their floor-time player that engages them in interaction all through the day. Then, we have a host of speech therapists, occupational therapists, music therapists, art therapists, recreational therapists and consultants that support the team," said Tyrpak.

Jennifer Horvath's 7-year-old daughter, Rachel, is a student at Soaring Eagle Academy. The mother says within the few months, she see significant changes.

"Everything, I think most of all I guess, that she can she has a connection with everybody in her life now, and they have a connection with her," said Horvath. "I mean, her brothers now, she plays with them all the time. But she never did before. No, she didn't know how."

Amanda Shadduck's son, Adam, is 5 years old.

"I had a friend of mine who said you should try floor-time because the two components of Adam's challenges are sensory processing and communications. So, Adam has a lot of issues with sensory things around him. He doesn't have a filter like we can filter out things, where Adam can't really do that. Things just sort of bombard him and he kind of doesn't know how to handle his own body," Shadduck said. "He's doing really well."

"He is engaging more with people around him. He's definitely talking more. He's developing his personality like things are coming out" said Shadduck.

..."You may find a child who is excited about lions, tigers. So, their math project is adding lions or reading books about lions. It's all about following the child's lead in their interest and trying to weave in Illinois learning standards in the process," said Tyrpak.

The cost of education for children who attend Soaring Eagle Academy is paid by their children's local school districts...
Here is a link to photos of the 'End of Year Party' at Soaring Eagle Academy from four-and-a-half years ago: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...7913880&type=3


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Old March 5th, 2016, 07:21 AM   #520
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Default Re: 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

The subject of recent posts has mainly been on Autism-related events and organisations in the state of Illinois.

To the west, The Homestead is an Altoona, Iowa-based nonprofit that, through its campus and community services, seeks to enrich the lives of people with Autism through work, play and community. The Homestead's programs work not only to help people with Autism adapt to mainstream society, but also to help mainstream society better adapt to people with Autism...
Quote:
Sarah Muhs of Newton suspected very early that her son, Cameron, had autism. By the age of 18 months, he didn’t point or wave bye-bye. He was throwing tantrums and losing words and sounds he had previously known by the time he was three. “He just couldn’t do it anymore,” she says.
Her suspicions were confirmed by an evaluation and eventually she and her husband, Cody, were able to enroll Cameron, now 4, in an intensive program called the Children’s Autism Project (CAP) at The Homestead in Altoona, an organization that serves the needs of both children and adults with autism. The program is funded through a partnership with the state of Iowa to provide research-based Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) programs to young children with autism.
Today, after a month in the program, the Muhs are seeing great results. Cameron can communicate with picture cards, is learning to do puzzles and take turns with fellow classmates. “He has fewer meltdowns,” Muhs says. “The instructors here are wonderful. He loves them and loves being with them.”

...[Cameron] is making significant strides in The Homestead’s CAP program, according to his clinic supervisor, Lisa Daniel. “We’ve seen an increase in socialization, appropriate play and responding to people in general,” [she] says. “He’s better at meeting others, taking turns and exploring the world. This is pretty big for him.”
CAP instructors work one-on-one with children ages three to eight, five days a week for two and a half hours a day. When children first come into the program, they work in a small room with their instructor and eventually, as their skills improve, they join other children in a bright room filled with games and puzzles. Parents also receive training so they can reinforce their child’s learning at home.
“Autism interferes with living,” says Evelyn Horton, youth community services director at The Homestead. “If you don’t learn things like how to stay in a chair, what to pay attention to, how to follow instructions and how to problem solve, your future is limited. That’s what we’re trying to change.”
Steve Muller, executive director of The Homestead, says results of the program’s first year have been phenomenal. “The children are showing increased communication and social skills,” he says. “This allows them to better function at school, home and in the community.” Muller notes that IQ scores have improved and some children initially diagnosed with mental retardation fall into a normal range after intensive ABA services.
An added bonus is that the early intervention can save taxpayers millions of dollars over the course of a child’s lifetime. The cost of autism is about $3.2 million per person for that time span, according to the Autism Society of America. That cost can be drastically cut when early intervention helps the child to grow into an adult who can live on his or her own and gain employment.
“Research suggests that we are creating for children an improved developmental arc – somewhere between where the child would be with no extra supports and where a typically developing child would be,” Muller says. “If we can decrease the need for expensive and life-long services by 50 percent, that savings could be millions over the child’s lifetime.”

...Chuck Palmer, director of the Iowa Department of Human Services, states, “Services for children with autism are clearly important. Early intervention for these children and family members has been shown to be highly effective in addressing many of the symptoms of autism. We continue to learn more about this condition, and programs like The Homestead’s Children’s Autism Project have demonstrated an ability to make significant differences in these children’s lives.”
“It’s a perfect private and public partnership,” Muller says. “In the end, we’re all working together to create a better, more productive life for persons with autism.”...
Here is a link to a video on the 'Children’s Autism Project' at The Homestead:


Last edited by Visionary7903; March 7th, 2016 at 04:36 AM.
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