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Old March 26th, 2012, 10:31 AM   #181
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

Below is a report from the founder of a newly created Tennis for Autism group in Cleburne, Texas. The person organising this seems to have a psychology-background and wants to focus on children on the more severe end of the Autistic Spectrum, which is welcome given the difficulty that many parents have in getting these children into activities...
Quote:
...I have been working for a while now on developing a tennis program for children with autism. There are many personal accounts out there reporting that children with autism can show significant improvement through participating in tennis. ...In this program, a research based teaching strategy is used for children with moderate-severe autism, called 'least to most prompting procedure'. In this procedure a child is prompted to perform a task, ex. Hit a forehand. When the child does not respond within seconds, the child is then prompted again, ex. Hit a forehand. As the child is prompted the second time they are then assisted through the motion of a forehand. The idea behind this procedure is that over time the child learns to complete the task without being prompted a second time. In this program I require parent or another responsible family member's participation. The reason for this is that for strategies the child learns at tennis to continue BEYOND tennis, the family must be involved and learn to use some of these same strategies in the home. Likewise, including parents in the lesson insures that parents then have strategies to follow to be able to take their children out and play tennis on their own. For those of you that are not familiar with autism, it can often be difficult for families to find activities that they can use to interact as a family with their children.

...My first group will begin February 26 in Cleburne, Texas (Abilene group to follow shortly)...

...Every report I have found, a tennis pro not formally educated in psychology has taught these children to play tennis, and has found great success in doing so. I am excited to see what combining a psychology background AND tennis experience can do for these kids!
(source: Tennis for Autism *Cleburne, Texas* Chapa Images)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 10:55 AM   #182
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

Various Tennis events help to act as fundraisers for organisations associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Because Tennis is such a popular spectator sport, there are many household names (for example former tennis professionals) around who are glad to give up some of their time for a good cause. These ex-players help to draw the crowds of course and the funding. In the below quoted passage for example, former professional Gigi Fernandez came along - she actually has a relative with Autism which made the event even more meaningful for her...
Quote:
The North Shore Autism Circle hosted their First Annual Serve an Ace for Autism Celebrity Pro-Am tournament ... sponsored by Long Island Tennis Magazine and Sportime. The event and evening were a great success thanks to all who came out and supported the cause which provides after-school and weekend programs for children with autism. Nearly $10,000 was raised for the charity.

"The turnout tonight was amazing with some high-level tennis players. Most of all, this is all about raising money for a great cause," said former professional player Ilana Kloss, former number one-ranked doubles player in the world.

...A silent auction, numerous raffles, a prize drawing from Liberty Travel/Sandals and autographed memorabilia from Shafran Collectibles were all part of the night's activities. Most importantly, the event benefited a very worth cause, the North Shore Autism Circle. It meant a lot for many people, including former professional Gigi Fernandez, who came up from Florida, said, "I came out today because a family member of mine is autistic and this helps support a great cause which is relatable to me."

"Everyone had a great time, and we raised a lot of money for a great cause," said event coordinator Randye ... recapping a great evening.
(source: Tennis Community Steps Up and Serves an Ace for Autism | Long Island Tennis Magazine)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 12:00 PM   #183
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

In a post of mine from late last year, I mentioned Robert Austin, a Harvard Business School professor.
Quote:
...In an article he co-wrote this year with Javier Busquets, Austin quotes a manager at one of Specialisterne's client companies, who had a revelation when he realised the tailored management approach could benefit all his staff.

"He realised that the same approach could be applied to all his employees, especially the particularly talented ones.

"Many (but not all) of those, he observed, had eccentricities or other idiosyncrasies of personality or behaviour."

He goes on: "You don't apply interchangeable units of labour to a task; rather, you 'cast' a group of variously talented 'actors' particularly suited to their roles. And you don't get to choose among the features, only among the people. Suppress idiosyncrasy and risk suppressing talent also..."
Similarly, an adaptive Tennis program for children with Autism being developed in Getzville, New York by Brian and Pam may also give these instructors ideas that could be used to improve their teaching of 'neurotypical' kids...
Quote:
...My main business is creative problem solving, so I like playing in the mind," [Brian] said. "To learn how to break things down into very, very small, bite-sized chunks [for the Autistic kids] has been a nice challenge on the tennis side, which I've been transferring to working with typical kids as well. So there's been a lot of learning for me, too"...
(sources: Company where being 'different' is a bonus; http://www.thinkfirstserve.com/uploa...8c2be55e3d.pdf)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 12:21 PM   #184
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

One issue that may be a problem for kids with Autism and their often busy parents is accessibility to sporting facilities. While there are quite a few special needs Tennis programs around the United States, it would be quite a coincidence if a family with a child with Autism lived near one. If a child with Autism wanted to try going to classes with the mainstream kids (located in a convenient location) that might be problematic as well - the Autistic child might take longer to learn the sport, have difficulty with behaviour and social interactions, and might require a lot more one-on-one time with the instructor then others.

A model like that of Elftennis might be a solution - it is a portable tennis school based in New York, NY. Elftennis offers indoor tennis lessons using portable nets and oversize foam balls...
Quote:
...Because it is portable Elftennis can teach unique segments of the populations. For instance, Elftennis works with autistic children at SNACK (Special Needs Activity Center for Kids) NYC on E.86th. [Esther, founder of Elftennis] says, "Many of the kids are making headway. At first the kids had difficulty in holding the ball. Now some of the kids are able to connect the ball with a racquet. The kids are hitting, smashing forehands and backhands, and
thoroughly enjoying unleashing their power. It has been very rewarding to teach them."

...[Esther] explains tennis helps the autistic students work on tasks that they may find daunting. Often, students with autism find it harrowing to share and take turns. Sometimes, they have to share the racquets and the balls; they are forced to accept it. In addition, students have trouble transitioning from one activity to another. Elftennis classes contain three different activities for each class and they have to adjust quickly. In addition, when throwing and hitting to their aid or their partner, they gain practice at acknowledging another human being. [Esther] believes that tennis is teaching them life skills...
(source: http://www.elftennis.com/uploads/adv...ng_rates_2.pdf)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 12:30 PM   #185
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

In a post above, I mentioned the involvement of the American Taekwondo Association (ATA) in helping with the correct instruction of kids with Autism in that sport.

Similarly, the Tennis hierarchy has been involved in trying to ensure that kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders are able, wherever possible, to get suitable quality instruction for their sport. Here is a blurb from the United States Tennis Association (USTA) website:
Quote:
...Q. I have been asked to teach tennis to a 10-year-old autistic boy. I have never worked with an autistic person before. Do you have any advice for me?

A. We run an ambitious program for Autistic Children at the USTA National Tennis Center. We integrate the autistic children with their ably developed brothers and sisters, and this creates a great family environment out on the courts. It has been a successful program.

The biggest keys to teaching tennis to an autistic child are:

1. To get eye contact. Maintaining focus will be the autistic player's greatest challenge.

2. To ask a parent or an assistant to help. This constant, virtually one-on-one, attention makes a huge difference.

3. Make it fun. Lots of fun.

Good luck in this endeavor...
(source: http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Gam...nity/Coaching/)

Last edited by Visionary7903; March 26th, 2012 at 12:49 PM.
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Old March 26th, 2012, 12:46 PM   #186
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

A combination of a great, devoted coach and two devoted parents can certainly play a strong part in sporting success for someone with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Here is an example of 18-year-old Nick and Tennis...
Quote:
...Nick ... has autism. But thanks to a devoted tennis coach and two gutsy parents, he has found a sport that not only captivates him, but has given him a social outlet the he has not found in other sports.
...Nick has spent a decade on the tennis courts...
...Diagnosed with autism as a toddler, sports have always been the best way for Nick to interact with others, according to his father, Wayne, who was a strong tennis player growing up in Chicago. ...Nick has deficits in language, cognitive ability and social and emotional deficits. Nick can be a challenge as he has many of the stereotypical repetitive behaviors that characterize autism, and also has difficulty focusing combined with hyperactivity. Nick can get very frustrated, which means it's been a trial and error process to try various sports, including tennis.
Luckily, trying tennis has given Nick the opportunity to work with a very dedicated Special Olympics Coach, Vicky ... who has coached him since the age of 8. Vicky answered an advertisement seeking coaches for adaptive programs and has gone on to make a dramatic difference in the lives of many families. Vicky had coached at [Nick] for 15 years and understood the type of commitment it would take to be involved in these special programs.
Nick sums up his feelings about Coach Vicky with an enthusiastic, "She's nice!"
...Parents Wayne and Marilyn ...deeply appreciate the years Vicky has spent with Nick and the progress he has made. "Vicky has a way about her, always giving kids more chances," Wayne said, adding that "she's very structured and sets limits," which is crucial to working within the boundaries of Nick's autism. "Vicky is really very special. She's a lot of the reason that it has worked,"
...Describing Nick as "the cutest kid" when he started the program, Vicky warmly describes her long time student as "outgoing and happy. He just loves to be there with everyone." Vicky knew early on that it was going to take a unique approach to engage Nick. ...She also credits Wayne and Marilyn for their extreme dedication to their son. "They never miss a practice and the consistency and commitment from the parents is so vital."
..."Parents need to have the guts to try everything, but to have the right expectations," she said.
"The joy is in seeing Nick learn new things, and he really likes being there," Wayne said. He said Vicky is a natural for working with Nick, a rare combination of ability and temperament. "I still can't believe someone like Vicky is willing to spend so much time volunteering. She's just a very special person."
(source: USTA Colorado - the Colorado Tennis Association)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 12:59 PM   #187
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

In an above post, I mentioned Elftennis in New York, NY. Elftennis, a portable Tennis school, uses oversized foam balls, right-sized racquets, and smaller portable nets to make the game easier for young children with special needs.

Similarly, Vicky (Nick's coach in the post just above) stresses the importance of adapting the conditions to effectively instruct Tennis to someone with an Autism Spectrum Disorder...
Quote:
...Vicky knew early on that it was going to take a unique approach to engage Nick. "You have to make sure that children like Nick are in Adaptive Tennis programs, because a traditional professional approach would not be successful." ...She also uses rubber T-balls which have helped him contact the ball.
...Marilyn would love to see Nick progress to the point of being able to play games someday, "even if it's only for fifteen minutes at a time." She wants other parents of autistic children to learn from their experience with Nick and possibly give tennis a try in an adaptive sports program...
(source: USTA Colorado - the Colorado Tennis Association)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 01:29 PM   #188
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

Here is an abstract of a Turkish study by Yanadarg et al published last year focusing on the success of the Least to Most (LTM) Prompting procedure for instructing tennis to kids with Autism.

LTM prompting provides the least intrusive prompt--thus allowing the opportunity to respond more to the learner?s needs. This prompting strategy is practicable if there is no real hurry to complete a task, such as when teaching a learner to participate in a leisure activity. When you continue to use high levels of prompts throughout teaching, the student may appear to be learning, but instead might be prompt dependent.
Quote:
In the present study, the effects of a least-to-most prompting procedure in teaching basic tennis skills (i.e. tennis ball dribble, air dribble and dribble the lines drills) to children with autism were investigated. A single-subject multiple-probe design with probe conditions across behaviors was used. Participants were four male children with autism, aged 7-9 years. Data were collected over the course of 6 weeks, five times a week, an hour per session. Inter-observer reliability data of the study was determined as 93% on probes and 100% on teaching sessions for participant one, 96% on probes and 100% on teaching sessions for participant two, 90% on probes and 100% on teaching sessions for participant three, and 93% on probes and 100% on teaching sessions for participant four. Procedural reliability showed that the trainer implemented the planned steps with 100% accuracy for all participants. Results revealed that least to most prompting was an effective instructional approach and all subjects increased their basic tennis skills considerably during intervention.
(source: Download ?lanka)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 01:44 PM   #189
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

Many neurotypical people are often, for various reasons, quite a bit better at, and more interested in, sports than those with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This means that someone should be able to instruct Autistics who are of the same age extent at a sport like Tennis even if they are no pro tennis player themselves. For an example of impressive hard work and organisation, a New jersey high school girl has managed to set up a program to teach Tennis to kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders...
Quote:
..."I've always liked working with kids, teaching them schoolwork or tennis. I like helping them learn and seeing them improve."
The seed was planted when her young cousin was diagnosed with autism and she became determined to help him. From that interaction and from her own research, she decided that sports can help children with autism. As a volunteer for Special Olympics, [Sahana] met an autistic child and began working with him, an experience she calls "rewarding and challenging." [Sahana] has expanded her project. She recruited another student ... from Princeton High. She connected with Gwen of Princeton Tennis Program, who was very interested and set aside indoor court time ... at no charge, and supplied a pro. Now, [Sahana] has 16 student volunteers and seven students; and her goal is to have the program continue successfully, even after her graduation...
(source: Girls' Tennis Spotlight: WW-P South High's Sahana Jayaraman is a mentor, leader | NJ.com)
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Old March 26th, 2012, 01:54 PM   #190
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Default 'Agricultural specialisterne': rural employment revolution for those with Autism

In the above post, the girl worked as a volunteer in the Special Olympics.

The Special Olympics offer an opportunity for athletes with Autism Spectrum Disorders to get true recognition and medals in their particular sports. Here is part of an article on a tennis tournament for the Special Olympics...
Quote:
As the U.S. Olympics theme song filled the air, athletes with autism and down syndrome took their place behind the baseline for the opening ceremony of the Special Olympics Regional Tennis Championship on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Also known as challengers, the athletes came ready to play, compete and win--a feat for their mind and body.

Challenger Claudia ... led the athletes in reciting the Special Olympics Motto: "Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt."...

Athletes came from all over the Southern California area to attend the Special Olympics competitive event. Nancy ... a 24-year-old challenger with Down Syndrome, came to the event from Tustin.

"This the first time we've come to Biola," said Maryann ... longtime volunteer for Special Olympics events and mother of Nancy ... "We love [tennis]. It's really part of our life. It's our recreation for the most part."...
(source: Special Olympics Tournament at Biola University | Biola University)
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